LEGAL
author Nicholas Nethercote <nnethercote@mozilla.com>
Fri, 16 Feb 2018 17:54:16 +1100
changeset 407868 32d6774930e55be5c03e8d631fc067a995623c1e
parent 1 9b2a99adc05e53cd4010de512f50118594756650
permissions -rw-r--r--
Bug 1438678 - Pass early prefs via shared memory instead of the command line. r=bobowen,jld,glandium. This patch replaces the large -intPrefs/-boolPrefs/-stringPrefs flags with a short-lived, anonymous, shared memory segment that is used to pass the early prefs. Removing the bloat from the command line is nice, but more important is the fact that this will let us pass more prefs at content process start-up, which will allow us to remove the early/late prefs split (bug 1436911). Although this mechanism is only used for prefs, it's conceivable that it could be used for other data that must be received very early by children, and for which the command line isn't ideal. Notable details: - Much of the patch deals with the various platform-specific ways of passing handles/fds to children. - Linux and Mac: we use a fixed fd (8) in combination with the new GeckoChildProcessHost::AddFdToRemap() function (which ensures the child won't close the fd). - Android: like Linux and Mac, but the handles get passed via "parcels" and we use the new SetPrefsFd() function instead of the fixed fd. - Windows: there is no need to duplicate the handle because Windows handles are system-wide. But we do use the new GeckoChildProcessHost::AddHandleToShare() function to add it to the list of inheritable handles. We also ensure that list is processed on all paths (MOZ_SANDBOX with sandbox, MOZ_SANDBOX without sandbox, non-MOZ_SANDBOX) so that the handles are marked as inheritable. The handle is passed via the -prefsHandle flag. The -prefsLen flag is used on all platforms to indicate the size of the shared memory segment. - The patch also moves the serialization/deserialization of the prefs in/out of the shared memory into libpref, which is a better spot for it. (This means Preferences::MustSendToContentProcesses() can be removed.) MozReview-Commit-ID: 8fREEBiYFvc

Please be apprised of the following Legal Notices:

A) The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia has
ruled that the Netscape Navigator code does not infringe Wang's U.S.
Patent No. 4,751,669 ("the '669 Patent") because: 1) HTML is not
Videotex as defined by the '669 patent; 2) web servers are not central
suppliers; and 3) Navigator does not "connect," as defined by the '669
Patent, to web servers on the Internet. Wang may appeal this decision to
the Federal Circuit. Wang contended that its Patent disclosing a
"Videotex" system, is infringed by the following functionality in the
Netscape Navigator code: 1) the animated logo and status line indicators
--See Claims 1,8 and 9; 2) the "File Save As" function --See Claims
23-27; 3) Bookmarks and Rename Bookmarks in the Properties window --See
Claims 20-22; 4) storing HTML, GIF, and JPEG files and adding filename
extensions --See Claim 38

B) Intermind owns pending U.S. patent applications on communications
systems which employ metadata ("channel objects") to define a control
structure for information transfer. The Netscape code does not infringe
as released; however, modifications which utilize channel objects as
described by Intermind should be considered carefully. The following is
a statement from Intermind: "Intermind's claims fundamentally involve
the use of a control structure to automate communications. ...The
essence of Intermind's top claim is that two devices sender and receiver
have persistent storage, communicate over a network, and exchange a
control structure including metadata which describes: 1) what
information is to be updated, 2) when to update this information, and 3)
how to transfer the updated information. In addition, at least the
receiving device must be able to process the metadata in order to
perform the update determination and transfer. Any digital
communications system which incorporates all of these elements will be
covered by Intermind's patents." See Intermind.com.

C) Stac, Inc., and its licensing agent Hi/fn, own several patents which
disclose data compression methods implementing an LZS compression
algorithm, including U.S. Patent Nos. 4,701,745 and 5,016, 009 ("the
Stac Patents"). The Netscape Communicator code does not perform
compression. If you modify the Netscape source code to perform
compression, please take notice of the Stac Patents.

D) Netscape Communications Corporation ("Netscape") does not guarantee
that any source code or executable code available from the mozilla.org
domain is Year 2000 compliant.