LEGAL
author Gregory Szorc <gps@mozilla.com>
Mon, 08 May 2017 17:19:05 -0700
changeset 361962 11ba6213be5a745d70e5c6fdcd036bafb1ac2718
parent 1 9b2a99adc05e53cd4010de512f50118594756650
permissions -rw-r--r--
Bug 1359965 - Support and generate tar.gz WPT archive; r=glandium Several years ago there was a single zip file for all test files. Clients would only extract the files they needed. Thus, zip was a reasonable archive format because it allowed direct access to members without having to decompress the entirety of the stream. We have since split up that monolithic archive into separate, domain-specific archives. e.g. 1 archive for mochitests and one for xpcshell tests. This drastically cut down on network I/O required on testers because they only fetched archives/data that was relevant. It also enabled parallel generation of test archives, we shaved dozens of seconds off builds due to compression being a long pole. Despite the architectural changes to test archive management, we still used zip files. This is not ideal because we no longer access specific files in test archives and thus don't care about single/partial member access performance. This commit implements support for generating tar.gz test archives. And it switches the web-platform archive to a tar.gz file. The performance implications for archive generation are significant: before: 48,321,250 bytes; 6.05s after: 31,844,267 bytes; 4.57s The size is reduced because we have a single compression context so data from 1 file can benefit compression in a subsequent file. CPU usage is reduced because the compressor has to work less with 1 context than it does with N. While I didn't measure it, decompression performance should also be improved for the same reasons. And of course network I/O will be reduced. mozharness consumers use a generic method for handling unarchiving. This method automagically handles multiple file extensions. So as long as downstream consumers aren't hard coding ".zip" this change should "just work." MozReview-Commit-ID: LQa5MIHLsms

Please be apprised of the following Legal Notices:

A) The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia has
ruled that the Netscape Navigator code does not infringe Wang's U.S.
Patent No. 4,751,669 ("the '669 Patent") because: 1) HTML is not
Videotex as defined by the '669 patent; 2) web servers are not central
suppliers; and 3) Navigator does not "connect," as defined by the '669
Patent, to web servers on the Internet. Wang may appeal this decision to
the Federal Circuit. Wang contended that its Patent disclosing a
"Videotex" system, is infringed by the following functionality in the
Netscape Navigator code: 1) the animated logo and status line indicators
--See Claims 1,8 and 9; 2) the "File Save As" function --See Claims
23-27; 3) Bookmarks and Rename Bookmarks in the Properties window --See
Claims 20-22; 4) storing HTML, GIF, and JPEG files and adding filename
extensions --See Claim 38

B) Intermind owns pending U.S. patent applications on communications
systems which employ metadata ("channel objects") to define a control
structure for information transfer. The Netscape code does not infringe
as released; however, modifications which utilize channel objects as
described by Intermind should be considered carefully. The following is
a statement from Intermind: "Intermind's claims fundamentally involve
the use of a control structure to automate communications. ...The
essence of Intermind's top claim is that two devices sender and receiver
have persistent storage, communicate over a network, and exchange a
control structure including metadata which describes: 1) what
information is to be updated, 2) when to update this information, and 3)
how to transfer the updated information. In addition, at least the
receiving device must be able to process the metadata in order to
perform the update determination and transfer. Any digital
communications system which incorporates all of these elements will be
covered by Intermind's patents." See Intermind.com.

C) Stac, Inc., and its licensing agent Hi/fn, own several patents which
disclose data compression methods implementing an LZS compression
algorithm, including U.S. Patent Nos. 4,701,745 and 5,016, 009 ("the
Stac Patents"). The Netscape Communicator code does not perform
compression. If you modify the Netscape source code to perform
compression, please take notice of the Stac Patents.

D) Netscape Communications Corporation ("Netscape") does not guarantee
that any source code or executable code available from the mozilla.org
domain is Year 2000 compliant.